How to Treat Burns and Scalds

Many burns need medical attention because of the risk of infection and shock. A young child or a sick or old person should always be taken to a doctor.

A burn or scald smaller than a 10p

If possible, remove rings, watch or tight clothing before the burnt area starts to swell.

Is it very painful?

If so, the burn is probably superficial. Put it under slow-running cold water for ten minutes, or longer if pain continues.

Cover the burn with clean, non-fluffy material. A sterile dressing is best, but the inside of a folded handkerchief, held on with cloth, will do.

Is it peeling or charred?

If the skin looks grey, and is peeling or charred and not very painful, the burn may be deep and serious. Cool it under slow-running cold water for ten minutes, then cover it with a dressing such as a clean handkerchief turned inside-out. Take the patient to a doctor or to the Accident and Emergency Department of a hospital.

DO NOT use plasters.

DO NOT apply fat, ointment or lotion.

DO NOT break a blister or touch the burn.

A burn or scald larger than a 10p

1. If possible, remove rings, watch or any constricting clothing before the area starts to swell.

A burn or scald larger than a 10p

2. Cool the burn by running it under a cold tap for ten minutes, or longer if the pain continues. Cool a large area with a damp, clean cloth, but don’t waste time before getting help.

3. Cover the burn with clean, non-fluffy material. A sterile dressing is best, but the inside of a clean folded handkerchief, held on with a scarf or some other piece of cloth, will do.

4. See your own doctor or go straight to the Accident and Emergency Department of your local hospital.

DO NOT use plasters.

DO NOT apply fat, ointment or lotion.

DO NOT break blisters or touch the burn.

A burn or scald covering a large area of the body

A person who receives burns over a large area of the body, such as an arm, thigh, lower leg or chest, needs urgent hospital treatment.

A burn or scald covering a large area of the body

1. Lay the injured person down, preferably on a rug or sheet to prevent the burnt part of the body from touching the ground. Cool the area with cold water on a clean cloth, but don’t waste time before getting medical help.

2. If possible, remove rings, watch, shoes or tight clothing before the area begins to swell. Carefully remove clothing soaked in boiling liquid.

Do not remove anything that is sticking to the burn.

For burns to the face, get a clean pillowcase out of the airing cup-board and make a mask

3. Telephone 999 and ask for an ambulance, or take the victim to the Accident and Emergency Department of your local hospital.

4. Cover the burn with clean, non-fluffy material, such as a pillowcase. Fix it in place with a scarf or a piece of clean cloth.

DO NOT break blisters.

DO NOT put fat, ointment or lotion on the burn.

DO NOT touch the bum.

For burns to the face, get a clean pillowcase out of the airing cup-board and make a mask by cutting holes for nose, mouth and eyes.

DO NOT break blisters.

DO NOT put fat, ointment or lotion on the burn.

DO NOT touch the burn.

5. If a person with burns on the front becomes unconscious, put him in this recovery position. Turn the head to one side and tilt it back to open the airway. Raise the opposite side of the body on a large cushion or a blanket.

A person with burns on the back should be placed in the normal recovery position.

A person with burns on the back should be placed in the normal recovery position.

06. October 2011 by admin
Categories: Burns/Scalds | Tags: , | Comments Off on How to Treat Burns and Scalds

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