Decorating with Different Types of Paint

ALL ABOUT PAINT

Paint is cheap, quick and easy to apply, and available in a variety of different finishes and in a host of different colours. Thanks to technological advances, modern paints cover well, protect surfaces from weather and wear, and resist fading and discoloration. For all these reasons — both practical and aesthetic — painting is the single most popular way of decorating interiors.

Basic painting techniques are simple to master and the equipment required is not elaborate. With a little extra skill, you can open up a whole new dimension of decorative possibilities using special effects such as sponging, ragging and stencilling.

 

 

types of paintTYPES OF PAINT

Paint consists of pigment (colour) dispersed in a medium (binder), together with a solvent or thinner which evaporates as the paint dries. Some paints may include other materials such as resin or silica to provide special characteristics. The two main types of paint are oil-based and water-based (commonly known as emulsion (latex!). They are incompatible when wet.

It is always a good idea to buy the best paint you can afford. Cheap paint is difficult to apply and looks streaky; you will end up needing to use more of it than with a good-quality paint.

 

Oil-based Paints

These come in three finishes: gloss, which has a high sheen and is often used on woodwork; semi-gloss or eggshell, which gives a mid-sheen texture and can be used on walls or woodwork; and matt or flat oil paint, which provides the basis for many special paint effects.

All oil-based paints are soluble in white spirit or turpentine and require an undercoat. They take longer to dry than water-based varieties of paint.

 

Undercoat

This oil-based paint is designed to provide a good surface for the application of oil-based top coats. It is soluble in white spirit or turpentine.

 

Water-based Paints

These are also available in different finishes: silk, satin or sheen and matt. A popular choice for walls and ceilings, emulsion (latex) is quick-drying, soluble in water (tools and spills are easy to clean) and needs no undercoat.

 

Non-drip Paints

Both oil- and water-based paints are available in non-drip versions which are easy for the beginner to apply. They need no stirring and should not be thinned. Similarly, trays of ‘solid emulsion’ can be useful for painting ceilings, stairways or wherever it is important to keep splashes to a minimum.

 

Textured ‘Paint’

This thick, permanent coating dries to a textured finish which is very difficult to remove. It is designed to cover up poor surfaces and should be finished with a coat of emulsion.

 

Masonry Paint

Essentially an external paint, this can be used on interior brickwork for a durable finish.

 

Enamel Paint

This is an oil-based paint for small areas of wood and metalwork. It is very dense; only one coat is needed. There is also a textured version which separates as it dries to give a ‘crazed’ finish.

 

Home-made Paints

You can create your own colours by mixing a small amount of artist’s colours (oil or gouache) with the appropriate solvent (white spirit, turpentine or water) and adding the mixture a little at a time to the appropriate paint base.


 

APPLICATIONS: UNDERCOAT OIL-BASED GLOSS OIL-BASED EGGSHELL (SEMI-GLOSS) WATER-BASED EMULSION (LATEX)/VINYL SOLID EMULSION (LATEX) ENAMEL TEXTURED PAINT
SURFACES TO USE ON Use on primed surfaces. Do not use on plastic, copper, brass or stainless steel Woodwork, metalwork. Can be applied to plastic and copper without using undercoat Walls, ceilings and woodwork. Ideal for bathrooms and kitchens Walls and ceilings. Vinyl silk/ satin can be used as a base coat for paint effects Walls and ceilings. Do not apply directly onto new/ unpainted plasterwork Metalwork, woodwork. Best for small areas Walls and ceilings. Particularly useful for covering uneven surfaces
EQUIPMENT Wide paintbrush, roller or spray gun for large areas, small paintbrush for details Wide paintbrush, roller or spray gun for large areas, small paintbrush for details Paintbrushes, roller and tray, or spray gun Paintbrushes, roller and tray, or spray gun Roller for large areas and paintbrush for details. Usually sold in its own tray Paintbrushes for small areas, roller or spray gun for larger areas Shaggy (coarse nap) roller and tray
DILUTING White spirit or turpentine can be used to thin the paint White spirit or turpentine can be used to thin the paint White spirit or turpentine can be used to thin the paint Use water to thin the paint if necessary Should not be thinned White spirit or turpentine can be used to thin the paint Should not be thinned
POSSIBLE PROBLEMS Can be used as a top coat, but must be covered with matt varnish to avoid marking Go back over painted surfaces to brush out drips and runs Patchiness can occur if surface is not thoroughly prepared and completely dry Oil-based paint and water-based paint are incompatible when wet Too absorbent to take most paint effects. Not recommended for kitchens and bathrooms Shows up imperfections of surface, so thorough preparation is necessary Extremely difficult to remove
DRYING TIME 2-6 hours. A second coat can usually be applied after 6-16 hours 4-6 hours. A second coat can usually be applied after 16-24 hours 4-6 hours. A second coat can usually be applied after 16-24 hours 2-4 hours. A second coat can usually be applied after 2-4 hours 1-4 hours. A second coat can usually be applied after 1-4 hours 2-4 hours. A second coat can usually be applied after 1-4 hours 1-4 hours
CLEANING Use white spirit or turpentine to clean brushes immediately after use Use white spirit or turpentine to clean brushes immediately after use Use white spirit or turpentine to clean brushes and equipment Brushes and other equipment should be cleaned with water and soap

 

Roller and tray should be cleaned with water and soap Use white spirit or turpentine to remove paint from brushes Use white spirit or turpentine to remove paint from roller and tray
NUMBER OF COATS 1 or 2 2 1 or 2 1 or 2 2 1 or 2 1 coat, followed by a coat of emulsion (latex) or gloss
SPECIAL PROPERTIES It has a high pigment content, and covers well. Chalky texture as top coat Undercoat is not always necessary. Durable and easy to clean Smooth finish with dull sheen. Easy to clean and withstands condensation No primer required. Dries quickly to a smooth finish Particularly good for ceilings and stairways because it is non-drip No primer required. Some brands also contain rust inhibitors. Hard, shiny finish Much thicker than regular paint. Can be used to create various surface patterns
COLOURS Limited to a few basic colours Wide range of colours, some coordinating with water-based ranges Range of colours Wide range of colours Limited range of colours Range of colours Coloured paint is applied to textured surface


02. June 2011 by admin
Categories: Decorating, Painting | Tags: , | Comments Off on Decorating with Different Types of Paint

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